Coping strategies, psychological impact and support preferences of men with rheumatoid arthritis

Flurey, C. A., Hewlett, S., Rodham, Karen, White, A., Noddings, R. and Kirwant, J. (2017) Coping strategies, psychological impact and support preferences of men with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Care and Research, 70 (6). pp. 851-860. ISSN 0893-7524

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Abstract

Objective
To investigate the existence and distribution of 2 typologies (termed “factors”) of men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) identified through our previous Q‐methodology study (n = 30) in a larger sample of men with RA, and whether differences in psychosocial impact or support preferences exist between the 2 factors, and between men and women with RA.

Methods
A postal survey was sent to 620 men with RA from 6 rheumatology units across England, and the support preferences section of the survey was given to 232 women with RA.

Results
A total of 295 male patients (47.6%) and 103 female patients (44.4%) responded; 15 male participants had missing data, and thus 280 were included in the analysis. Of these, 61 (22%) were assigned to factor A (“accept and adapt”), 120 (35%) were assigned to factor B (“struggling to match up”), and 99 (35%) were unassigned. The two factors differed significantly, with factor B reporting more severe disease, less effective coping strategies, and poorer psychological status. For support, men favored a question and answer session with a consultant (54%) or specialist nurse (50%), a website for information (69%), a talk by researchers (54%), or a symptom management session (54%). Overall, women reported more interest in support sessions than men, with ≥50% of women reporting interest in nearly every option provided.

Conclusion
Some men accept and adapt to their RA, but others (43%) report severe disease, less effective coping, and poor psychological status. Men's preferences for support are practical, with a focus on expanding their knowledge.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Karen Rodham
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2021 14:37
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2021 14:37
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/6026

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