A Between-Participant Online Study Investigating the Effects of Framed Messages and Meditation Technique on Mental health and Behaviour

Tarin, S (2020) A Between-Participant Online Study Investigating the Effects of Framed Messages and Meditation Technique on Mental health and Behaviour. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The world is full of negative global events, such as the recent outbreak of COVID-19, which negatively impact mental health, including inferiority, depression, anxiety, stress and self-esteem. Hence, improving our mental health is vital. Objectives: To investigate the main and interaction effects of message framing (loss vs gain) and meditation technique (breath-awareness vs mantra) on self-reported mental health indices (inferiority, depression, anxiety, perceived stress and self-esteem) and compliance to engage in meditation at follow-up. Method: A 2 (message framing: loss, gain)  2 (meditation technique: breath-awareness, mantra) between-subjects experimental design was used. One hundred participants completed two questionnaires. Time 1 questionnaire measured baseline inferiority, depression, anxiety, perceived stress, self-esteem, previous experience of meditation, intention to meditate and attitude towards meditation. Participants were shown a message about meditation (gain or loss-frame), then meditation instructions (breath-awareness or mantra meditation), hence being randomly allocated into one of four conditions. Time 2 questionnaire measured the same mental health indices and meditating behaviour. Results: There were no significant main effects nor interaction effects of message framing and meditation technique on mental health indices at follow-up, except for a marginally significant interaction effect between message framing and meditation technique on perceived stress, as those in the gain/breath condition reported the lowest levels of perceived stress and those in the gain/mantra condition reported the highest. There were no significant main nor interaction effects of message framing and meditation technique on meditating behaviour, even when controlling for previous experience of meditation. Conclusion: The study had no major significant findings, but has strengths, limitations, ideas for future research and implications.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: message framing, meditation technique, mental health, meditating behaviour
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2020 12:56
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2020 12:56
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/5405

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