An analysis of maternal and paternal attachments with children aged 5-16 who have received a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Mason, Annie (2019) An analysis of maternal and paternal attachments with children aged 5-16 who have received a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The topic for this dissertation has been influenced by several factors. Firstly, the work of academics and theorists such as John Bowlby, Mary Ainsworth, Peter Fonagy, Sue Gerhardt and Graham Music have proved pivotal in raising awareness concerning attachment difficulties experienced by children and families who are personally affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Secondly, the autistic spectrum has been a personal interest for many years. This dissertation has supported the development of professional knowledge and awareness, whilst also informing future practice.
The first aim of this dissertation was to critically analyse previous research concerning the quality of maternal and paternal attachments with their autistic child, aged 5-16 years. The second aim is to fill some gaps in the research. The current research shows some great depth, but some questions remain unanswered.
Primary data has been collected using a qualitative and interpretivist approach, consisting of nine interviews with participants who have been affected by ASD. The sample group consists of families directly affected by ASD (parents and siblings) and also professionals who have worked with children with ASD.
The primary data findings were consistent with the literature. Much like other research studies, the males included in this project were largely underrepresented, with three male participants compared to six female participants. All participants displayed the view that children with ASD are capable of forming secure attachments but do so in a slightly different way to that of typically-developing children.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Children and Families
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Women
Divisions: Departments > Social Work
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2020 13:59
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2020 14:07
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/5058

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