Effects of Threat and Sleep Deprivation on Action Tendencies and Response Inhibition

Van Peer, J. M., Gladwin, Thomas Edward and Nieuwenhuys, A. (2018) Effects of Threat and Sleep Deprivation on Action Tendencies and Response Inhibition. Emotion. ISSN 1528-3542 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text (©American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission.)
Accepted.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The ability to control action is crucial for adaptive responding, but may be compromised in
situations involving strong emotions (e.g., threat) or when people are deprived of resources
(e.g., sleep). As compromised action control can have large consequences in threatening
situations, for example when police officers face a potentially armed suspect, we
experimentally investigated how acute threat and partial sleep deprivation affect the ability to
control impulsive responses, in 52 healthy young adults performing a simulated shooting task.
The results showed that acute threat increased the tendency to act quickly (i.e., reduced
response times; Coef = 9.46, 95% CI [3.49, 15.29], p = .001) and impaired response inhibition
(i.e., increased stop signal reaction times; Coef = -4.91, 95% CI [-9.47, -0.44], p = .035). In
addition, three nights of partial sleep deprivation (five hours [n = 28] vs. eight hours [n = 24]
of sleep), led to a significant decrease in overall response accuracy (Coef = -0.22, 95% CI [-
0.40, -0.05], p = .025). Contrary to expectations, our results did not show increased threat
sensitivity in sleep-deprived individuals (all p > .13). Nevertheless, they may have important
implications for professionals who are required to maintain behavioral control under high
levels of threat and who experience disturbed sleep due to e.g. shift work, as both factors
negatively affected performance

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ©American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: doi:10.1037/emo0000533.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
Divisions: Research Centres > POWER Centre
Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Thomas Gladwin
Date Deposited: 12 Sep 2018 09:54
Last Modified: 12 Sep 2018 10:43
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3688

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item