Anthocyanin-rich blackcurrant extract preserves gastrointestinal barrier permeability and reduces enterocyte damage but has no effect on microbial translocation and inflammation after exertional heat stress

Lee, B. J., Flood, T. R., Hiles, A., Walker, E. F., Wheeler, L., Ashdown, K., Willems, M. E. T., Costello, R., Greisler, L., Romano, P., Hill, G. and Kuennen, M.R. (2022) Anthocyanin-rich blackcurrant extract preserves gastrointestinal barrier permeability and reduces enterocyte damage but has no effect on microbial translocation and inflammation after exertional heat stress. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 32 (4). pp. 265-274. ISSN 1543-2742

[thumbnail of Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2022, https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0330 © Human Kinetics, Inc.] Text (Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2022, https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0330 © Human Kinetics, Inc.)
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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of 7 days of 600 mg/day anthocyanin-rich blackcurrant extract intake on small intestinal permeability, enterocyte damage, microbial translocation and inflammation following exertional heat stress. Twelve recreationally active men (maximal aerobic capacity = 55.6 ± 6.0 mL.kg-1.min-1) ran (70% VO2max) for 60 minutes in an environmental chamber (34°C, 40% relative humidity) on two occasions (Placebo/Blackcurrant, randomized double-blind cross over). Permeability was assessed from a 4-hour urinary excretion of lactulose (L) and rhamnose (R) and expressed as a ratio of L/R. Venous blood samples were taken at rest and 20, 60 and 240 min after exercise to measure enterocyte damage (intestinal fatty acid binding protein, I-FABP), microbial translocation (sCD14; lipopolysaccharide binding protein, LBP), and interleukins 6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10) and 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). Exercise increased rectal temperature (by ~2.8 °C) and heart rate (by ~123 beats.min-1) in each condition. Blackcurrant supplementation led to a) ~12% reduction in L/R ratio (p<0.0034) and enterocyte damage (~40% reduction in I-FABP area under the curve, AUC; p<0.0001) relative to placebo. No between condition differences were observed immediately after exercise for LBP (+80%, +61 to +99%; mean, 95% confidence interval), sCD14 (+37%, +22 to +51%), IL-6 (+494%, +394 to +690%), IL-10 (+288%, +105 to +470%) or IL-1RA (+47%, +13 to +80; all time main effects). No between-condition differences for these markers were observed after 60 or 240 min of recovery. Blackcurrant extract preserves the GI barrier, however at sub-clinical levels this had no effect on microbial translocation and downstream inflammatory processes.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Exercise, Hyperthermia, Anthocyanins, Inflammation, Small intestinal, Permeability, Nutrition and Dietetics, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, General Medicine, Medicine (miscellaneous)
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: Academic Areas > Institute of Sport > Area > Exercise Physiology
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Depositing User: Mark Willems
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2022 12:49
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2022 14:31
URI: https://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/6124

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