The earlier the better? A case study into the perceived benefits of and/or barriers to learning and additional language in KS1.

Student, A. (2020) The earlier the better? A case study into the perceived benefits of and/or barriers to learning and additional language in KS1. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The earlier the better? This research project set out to determine the perceived benefits of and/or barriers to learning a Modern Foreign Language (MFL) in Key Stage 1. In addition to a general consideration of Critical Period Hypothesis, the project focused on “the age factor” in MFL within three key areas: phonics/phonological awareness, attitudes/motivations and intercultural understanding. The aim was to use the subsequent findings to offer an indication as to whether pupils at the case study school might benefit from being explicitly taught, or at least introduced to an additional language prior to Key Stage 2. Research findings concluded that explicit phonics teaching in early MFL created barriers to the learning, but young children’s emerging phonological awareness can be of benefit to their MFL acquisition. Young children’s attitudes and motivations were found to be of benefit to learning in MFL. The research was however inconclusive in determining whether or not an early start in MFL can more effectively develop KS1 children’s intercultural understanding. Overall, the findings suggest that the earlier children are introduced to MFL, the better.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Primary Teaching
Uncontrolled Keywords: MFL, modern foreign language, primary teaching
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Divisions: Departments > Education
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ruth Clark
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2020 10:08
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2020 10:08
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/5236

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