The Discourse of Writing History

Clark, A. (2022) The Discourse of Writing History. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

dissertation examines the limitations of writing History, and the impact the discussion of conspiracy theories may have on these already existing problems. It explores the presence of conspiracy theories within society through the analysis of survey results from 62 participants and the examination of a range of different theories, to determine how important they truly are. The most influential theories within to this research include identifying the true date of Edward II’s death, whether Elizabeth I was really a man, and the circumstances of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Several twenty-first century theories have also been incorporated in order to understand how they affect the world in present time. Finally, it will discuss what changes need to take place during the creation of Historiography to ensure that limitations are minimalised. This study will be important moving forward as the circulation of conspiracies continues to escalate, especially if Historians struggle to decipher between what ‘facts’ belong to the event which actually took place, and what was just speculation from a theory. Overall, the research that has been carried out has attempted to establish what History will have to look like moving forward in order to maintain its reliability.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: A Dissertation Submitted in Part of Fulfillment of the BA (HONS) History
Uncontrolled Keywords: Writing History, Conspiracy Theories
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: Academic Areas > Institute of Arts and Humanities > History
Student Research > Undergraduate
Depositing User: Gail Graffham
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2022 11:51
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2022 11:51
URI: https://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/6615

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