Injuries in youth football and the relationship to player maturation: an analysis of time-loss injuries during four seasons in an English elite male football academy

Light, N., Johnson, A., Williams, S., Smith, Neal A., Thorborg, K. and Hale, Beverley J. (2021) Injuries in youth football and the relationship to player maturation: an analysis of time-loss injuries during four seasons in an English elite male football academy. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. ISSN 0905-7188

[img] Text (This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13933. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving)
SJMSS paper clean version Jan 31st.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 9 February 2022.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (123kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

A better insight into injuries in elite youth football may inform prevention strategies. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the frequency, incidence and pattern of time-loss injuries in an elite male football academy, exploring injuries in relation to age and maturation status. Across four consecutive playing seasons, playing exposure and injuries to all academy players (U’9 to U’21) were recorded by club medical staff. Maturation status at the time of injury was also calculated for players competing in U’13 to U’16 aged squads.
Time-loss injury occurrence and maturation status at time of injury were the main outcome measures. A total of 603 time-loss injuries were recorded, from 190 different players. Playing exposure was 229,317 hours resulting in an overall injury rate of 2.4 p/1000h, ranging from 0.7 p/1000h (U’11) to 4.8 p/1000h (u’21). Most injuries were traumatic in mechanism (73%). The most common injury location was the thigh (23%) and the most common injury type was muscle injury (29%) combining to provide the most common injury diagnosis; thigh muscle injury (17%). In U’13-U’16 players, a higher number of injuries to early-maturing players were observed in U’13-U’14 players, whilst more injuries to U’15-U’16 players occurred when classed as ‘on-time’ in maturity status. Maturation status did not statistically relate to injury pattern, however knee bone (not-fracture) injuries peaked in U’13 players whilst hip/groin muscle injuries peaked in U’15 players.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Injury, Academy, Football, Youth, Epidemiology, Maturation, Incidence, Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Neil Light
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2021 12:38
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2021 12:07
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/5621

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item