An Investigation into the Effects of Proscriptive and Prescriptive Framed Messages Followed by Autonomous and Heteronomous Framed Implementation Intentions to Reduce Night-Time Phone Use

Mottashed, L (2020) An Investigation into the Effects of Proscriptive and Prescriptive Framed Messages Followed by Autonomous and Heteronomous Framed Implementation Intentions to Reduce Night-Time Phone Use. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Objectives: Sleep hygiene refers to behaviours which improve the quantity and quality of sleep (Stepanski & Wyatt, 2003). However, there are behaviours which should be avoided as they interfere with sleep such as night-time phone use, subsequently having negative impacts on health. The aim of this research project was to experimentally examine differences in night-time phone use through framing manipulations on messages (prescriptive-frame and proscriptive-frame) and implementation intentions (autonomy-frame and heteronomy-frame and control). Method: Two hundred at thirteen participants (68.1% female) completed two online questionnaires involving two manipulations; firstly, to read a message (prescriptive-frame vs. proscriptive-frame) and secondly to implement behavioural plans to reduce night-time phone use (autonomy-frame vs. heteronomy-frame vs. control group). The questionnaires measured general sleep hygiene behaviours, night-time phone use, message reactance, behavioural intentions, attitudes and autonomy. This study employed a 2 (message framing: proscriptive, prescriptive)  3 (implementation intention frame: control, autonomy, heteronomy) between-subjects experimental design. Results: Three ANCOVAs found no main effects found for message framing (proscriptive, prescriptive) on message reactance, behavioural intentions or attitudes to reduce night-time phone use. Two ANCOVAs found no main effects for implementation intention on night-time phone use or behavioural intentions at follow up. There were no significant effects found for the interaction of message frame and implementation intentions on night-time phone use or behavioural intentions at follow up. Conclusion: The study’s strengths, limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: message framing, proscriptive, prescriptive, implementation intention, autonomy, heteronomy, night-time phone use
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2020 15:01
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2020 15:01
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/5410

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