How do primary children of different ages understand and encode gendered assumptions and stereotypes about their own and others’ behaviour?

Student, A. (2017) How do primary children of different ages understand and encode gendered assumptions and stereotypes about their own and others’ behaviour? Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The following study considers the development of children’s gender stereotypes within the context of a rural primary school in the South of England. It sets out to ascertain when children develop gender stereotypes and some ways that these assumptions are influenced. Focus groups were chosen from five year groups to participate in two specially chosen activities: a picture-matching activity in which children matched job roles to images of male and female faces; and a scenario based role-play exercise where children chose which roles they would play. The teacher, adopting a researcher-practitioner role, observed the children undertaking these activities and conducted semi-structured interviews in order to collect data representative of children’s gender identity and gender stereotypes. Data revealed some common stereotypes that children held across the year groups. These findings also served as support for existing research, which indicates that the development of children’s gender stereotypes occurs before the age of five and remains consistent throughout their primary years. Based on these findings, it is clear that teachers, parents, the media, the cultural presumptions of a community and the attitudes that exist in the world as a whole all have significant impact on the ways in which primary children encode gendered assumptions and stereotypes about their own and others’ behaviour. According to the analysis contained herein, it is evident that teachers and schools could benefit from a continued awareness and understanding of gender stereotypes, whilst implementing strategies in the classroom and adjusting teaching practice to address issues of gender discrimination.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Primary Teaching
Uncontrolled Keywords: teaching, primary teaching, gender, stereotype,
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1501 Primary Education
Divisions: Departments > Education
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ruth Clark
Date Deposited: 23 Feb 2018 16:21
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2018 16:21
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3324

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