Freedom and happiness: a study of sociology and ethical philosophy in science fiction novels of the early twentieth century

Student, A. (2016) Freedom and happiness: a study of sociology and ethical philosophy in science fiction novels of the early twentieth century. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

This paper focuses on dystopian and utopian science fiction novels in order to highlight and discuss the conflict between personal freedom and happiness in society. The chosen primary texts are studied with supporting evidence from ethical philosophy to analyse changing views on freewill and identity. It becomes clear through comparison of these texts that the individual’s perception of freedom is largely dependent on the form of oppression they are exposed to.

These utopian and dystopian fictions are not only analysed as social commentaries but as works of philosophy in their own right as each text reveals inherent issues in communal living and provides insight into possible solutions. These issues revolve around conflict between the individual and the community, specifically when the rights of the group override the rights of the individual. The concluding argument theorizes that freedom and happiness are unable to exist together in society based on the philosophical and fictional evidence, which highlights freedom as detrimental to happiness.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing
Uncontrolled Keywords: Utopian, Dystopian, Science fiction
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN0080 Criticism
P Language and Literature > PR English literature
Divisions: Departments > English and Creative Writing
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2016 15:35
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2016 15:35
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/2076

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