An investigation into the utilisation of open-play crosses in the English Premier League.

McCafferty, P. (2015) An investigation into the utilisation of open-play crosses in the English Premier League. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine how crosses are utilised in the English Premier League. Specifically, the position that the crosses are delivered from, the delivery style, the position within the 18-yard box that the ball is delivered to and the defensive overload within the 18-yard box. A total of 30 English Premier League matches were observed; whereby 551 crosses were analysed. When the ball was crossed from zone A, 12.5% of crosses resulted in a goal and when the ball was crossed from zone B, 11.1% of crosses resulted in a goal. A significant association was found between cross location and number of goals scored (ᵡ² = 22.895, p=0.006). When low crosses were used, 30.1% of crosses resulted in a goal attempt and when in-swinging crosses were used, 24.7% of crosses resulted in a goal attempt. A significant association was found between delivery style and number of goal attempts (ᵡ² = 12.461, p=0.006). When the ball was delivered into zone 3, 25.6% of crosses were scored and when the ball was delivered into zone 6, 11.5% of crosses were scored. A significant association was found between delivery location and number of goals attempts (ᵡ² = 49.117, p=0.000). When no defensive overload was present, 45.7% of crosses resulted in a goal attempt and when a minimal defensive overload was present, 23.1% of crosses resulted in a goal attempt. A significant association was found between defensive overload and number of goal attempts (ᵡ² = 14.696, p=0.001). Results from this study suggest that cross location, delivery style, delivery location and the defensive overload are all contribute towards the effectiveness of crosses. Further investigation into how the effectiveness of crosses can be enhanced is recommended and suggestions for future research have been proposed.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Physical Education and Sport Coaching
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Departments > Physical Education and Sports Coaching
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2015 09:56
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2015 09:56
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/1563

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