Cross-cultural variations in extreme rejecting and extreme affirming response styles

Guo, Tieyuan and Spina, Roy (2019) Cross-cultural variations in extreme rejecting and extreme affirming response styles. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 50 (8). pp. 955-971. ISSN 0022-0221

[img] Text (Guo, T., & Spina, R. Cross-Cultural Variations in Extreme Rejecting and Extreme Affirming Response Styles. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 50(8), 955–971.Copyright the authors © 2019. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022119873072)
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Abstract

Previous research has discussed cultural differences in moderacy vs extremity response styles. The present research found that cultural differences in response styles were more complex than previously speculated. We investigated cross-cultural variations in extreme rejecting versus affirming response biases. Although research has indicated that overall Chinese have less extreme responses than Westerners, the difference may be mainly driven by extreme rejecting responses because respondents consider answering survey questions as a way of interacting with researchers, and extreme rejecting responses may disrupt harmony in relationships, which is valued more in Chinese collectivistic culture than in Western individualistic cultures. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that Chinese had less extreme rejecting response style than did British, whereas they did not differ in extreme affirming response style. Study 2 further revealed that the cross-cultural asymmetry in extreme rejecting versus affirming response styles was partially accounted for by individualism orientation at the individual level. Consistently, Study 3 revealed that at the country level, individualism was positively associated with extreme rejecting response style, but was not associated with extreme affirming response style, suggesting that individualism accounted for the asymmetric cultural variation in extreme rejecting versus affirming response styles.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Culture, Moderacy response bias, Extreme positive response bias, Extreme negative response bias, Individualism
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Research Centres > POWER Centre
Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Depositing User: Roy Spina
Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2019 10:06
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2019 10:06
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/4842

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