Cultural asymmetry between perceptions of past and future personal change

Guo, Tieyuan and Spina, Roy (2019) Cultural asymmetry between perceptions of past and future personal change. Frontiers in Psychology - Cultural Psychology, 10 (885). pp. 1-11. ISSN 1664-1078

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Text (First publication by Frontiers Media. Guo T and Spina R (2019) Cultural Asymmetry Between Perceptions of Past and Future Personal Change. Front. Psychol. 10:885. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00885)
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Abstract

Research has shown that Westerners expect less change to occur in the future than they recall having occurred in the past. The present research investigated how recalled change and anticipated change may vary across cultures. Because Chinese perceive past times as being closer to the present than do Westerners, and people believes things tend to change more over a long period of time than over a short period of time, Chinese may perceive smaller changes from the past to the present than do Westerners. Consequently, the asymmetry between recalled change and anticipated change would disappear for Chinese. Four empirical studies revealed that for British participants, recalled changes in the past for personality, values, and the person as a whole were greater than anticipated changes in the future, whereas for Chinese, recalled changes in the past were similar in magnitude as anticipated changes in the future. Studies 2b and 3 further revealed that subjective temporal distance accounted for the cross-cultural differences in the asymmetry between recalled and anticipated changes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright © 2019 Guo and Spina. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Culture, Change, Subjective temporal distance, Memory, Implicit theories
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Research Centres > POWER Centre
Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Depositing User: Roy Spina
Date Deposited: 16 May 2019 09:42
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2019 09:31
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/4669

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