The effects of a six-week plyometric training intervention on general and trampet specific jumping performance in teamgym gymnasts.

White, Frances (2018) The effects of a six-week plyometric training intervention on general and trampet specific jumping performance in teamgym gymnasts. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Gymnasts are required to perform complex aerial skills which are physically demanding. Coaches should be aware that performing these multifaceted skills alone will not develop the physical requirements necessary to execute and develop these skills. Plyometric training is one method which can significantly improve jump height and speed in youth artistic gymnasts (Hall, Bishop & Gee, 2016). However, the training method has not yet been established in the newer discipline of gymnastics, teamgym. Aim: Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the effects of plyometric training when combined with habitual gymnastics training on measures of general and trampet specific jump performance in youth national level gymnasts. Method: Institutional ethical approval was obtained. Eighteen female teamgym gymnasts (age 12 ± 1 years) participated in the study. The study was a mixed design and participants were assigned to a control or experimental group. The experimental group (n = 10) completed six-weeks of plyometric training (two additional plyometric sessions a week), alongside their habitual training. The control group (n = 8) only completed habitual training. Pre-test and post-tests were conducted for the dependent variables: countermovement jump height (CMJH), drop jump height (DJH); DJ contact time; reactive strength index (RSI); trampet approach velocity and the height of a tuck front somersault from the trampet. The variables related to jump performance were measured using a force platform (1000Hz, PASCO Scientific, USA) and somersault height was calculated from 2D motion analysis (Quintic Biomechanics V29, Quintic Ltd, UK). Results: The experimental and the control group improved trampet somersault height (P < 0.05, d = 1.154, d = 0.489) respectively. Further analysis showed the experimental group improved more than the control group (P < 0.05, d = 1.489), with average improvements of 14% (2.33 ± 0.31 m vs. 2.65 ± 0.24 m) and 5% (2.00 ± 0.19 m vs. 2.09 ± 0.22 m), respectively. Furthermore, the experimental group improved CMJH (P = 0.05, d = 0.783) by an average of 15% (0.26 ± 0.03 m vs. 0.30 ± 0.049 m); the control group showed no change. There were no significant improvements for DJH, contact time, RSI and trampet approach velocity for either groups. Conclusion: The addition of two sports-specific plyometric training sessions a week improved measures of general and specific jumping performance in youth gymnasts. Plyometric training should therefore be considered as part of their usual training routines.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Sports Science and Coaching
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV711 Coaching
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2019 16:23
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2019 16:23
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/4536

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