The impact of autonomy-framed and control-framed implementation intentions on snacking behaviour: the moderating effect of eating self-efficacy

Churchill, Susan, Pavey, Louisa and Sparks, Paul (2018) The impact of autonomy-framed and control-framed implementation intentions on snacking behaviour: the moderating effect of eating self-efficacy. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. ISSN 1758-0854

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Abstract

Background. Autonomy-supportive implementation intention exercises have been shown to facilitate goal-directed behaviour (Koestner et al., 2006). The current study explored whether eating self-efficacy moderated the impact of autonomy-framed versus control-framed implementation intentions to reduce high-calorie snack intake. Methods. The study employed a randomized prospective design, involving two waves of data collection conducted in 2016. At Time 1, UK participants (N = 300) completed an online questionnaire which asked them to report their snacking behaviour over the previous 7 days. Participants were subsequently asked to form either an autonomy-framed implementation intention or a control-framed implementation intention. Seven days later, participants reported their consumption of high-calorie snacks and completed a measure of eating self-efficacy. Results. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that eating self-efficacy moderated the effects of implementation intention framing. Autonomy-framed implementation intentions had a greater impact on the avoidance of snacking for high eating self-efficacy participants than did control-framed implementation intentions. In contrast, for low eating self-efficacy participants, control-framed implementation intentions had more impact than did autonomy-framed implementation intentions. Conclusions. The results suggest that if implementation intentions to promote healthy diet are to be effective, the role of eating self-efficacy should be considered, and the design of interventions adapted accordingly.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Churchill, Susan, Pavey, Louisa and Sparks, Paul (2018) The impact of autonomy-framed and control-framed implementation intentions on snacking behaviour: the moderating effect of eating self-efficacy. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being., which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/17580854. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Autonomy-framed Implementation Intentions; Control-framed Implementation Intentions; Eating Self-efficacy; Snacking, Applied Psychology.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Research Centres > POWER Centre
Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sue Churchill
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2018 12:53
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2019 00:10
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3593

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