The interplay between social media and risk-taking on adventure sports athletes

Hill, Nicholas David (2017) The interplay between social media and risk-taking on adventure sports athletes. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Participation in adventure and extreme sports is growing at an incredible rate, while more traditional/recreational activities, such as golf, are struggling to maintain numbers (Pain & Pain, 2005). Through the ever expanding dimension of social media, these sports/activities are publicised/glorified attracting new participation (Brymer, & Schweitzer, 2017). Theoretical perceptions of adventure/extreme sports and their participants have concluded that participation is based on risk-taking (Baker & Simon, 2002; Breivik, 1996; Laurendeau, 2008; Robinson, 2004; Self, Henry, Findley, & Reilly, 2007). This study examined whether there is a link between risk-promoting/glorifying social media exposure and risk taking cognitions/behaviours/ inclinations within an adventure sport setting amongst athletes. Thirty participants (19 male, 11 Female) were unconsciously primed by being exposed to social media content within one of three conditions: High-Risk, Low-Risk, and No-Risk Results, which saw differing levels of risk-glorifying/promoting media. Subsequent to exposure, accessibility of risk-taking cognitions and participants’ inclinations to act in a risk-seeking manner was measured via a Likert-type (Likert, 1932) risk-taking (disguised as decision-making) questionnaire. Mediational analyses clarified the underlying psychological process: Risk-promoting media content increases the accessibility of risk-promoting cognitions, which in turn results in increased risk-taking inclinations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed (Fisher, Greitemeyer, Kastenmüller, Vogrincic, & Sauer, 2011). Therefore, it was hypothesised that statistical differences would be examined between all three conditions. However, results only revealed a difference between High-Risk and No-Risk; no significant difference lay between Low-Risk and High-Risk, as well as No-Risk and Low-Risk conditions.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Adventure Education
Uncontrolled Keywords: Risk-Taking, Adventure, Sport, Social Media, Media, Priming, Prime
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Departments > Adventure Education
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2017 11:55
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2017 11:55
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3194

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