The impact of contextual information and a secondary task on anticipation performance: An interpretation using Cognitive Load Theory

Runswick, Oliver R., Roca, André, Williams, A. Mark, Bezodis, Neil E., McRobert, Allistair P. and North, Jame S. (2018) The impact of contextual information and a secondary task on anticipation performance: An interpretation using Cognitive Load Theory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 32 (2). pp. 141-149. ISSN 1099-0720

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Abstract

When performing under severe time constraints, sports performers use kinematic and contextual information to facilitate anticipation. We examined the relative importance of these two information sources and their impact on cognitive load and anticipation performance. Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) predicts that adding more information sources to a task will increase cognitive load in less-skilled but not skilled performers. Skilled and less-skilled cricket batters anticipated deliveries from bowlers on a life-size screen under four conditions that manipulated access to contextual information and included a secondary task. The presence of context enhanced anticipation accuracy for both skilled and less-skilled groups, without affecting cognitive load. Skilled performers used sequencing and game-related contextual information in addition to kinematic information to facilitate anticipation, while both groups reported using information pertaining to opponent positioning. Findings highlight the importance of context in anticipation and suggest that the addition of context may not necessarily negatively impact cognitive load.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: The impact of contextual information and a secondary task on anticipation performance, which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), Developmental and Educational Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Oliver Runswick
Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2017 14:02
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2019 12:24
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3169

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