Investigation into patterns in play during the build up to dismissals in cricket

Barker, Lucas (2017) Investigation into patterns in play during the build up to dismissals in cricket. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a computerised notation system to collect data from the same amount of group one day games played by each team in the 2016 Royal London one day cup competition. This computerised notation system was used to highlight possible causes of wickets from incidences that occurred prior to the dismissal. Method: Analysis was conducted on a total of 14 innings from seven games played in a season. These games met the inclusion criteria because all teams were of a similar level to avoid one sided games (Hughes et al., 2001). Analysis was conducted on the top seven batters during all batting innings. This is due to the general strategy used by cricket teams to place the better batsman near the beginning of the order and the weaker batsman near the end of the order (Swartz, Gill & Beaudoin, 2006). Data collection was conducted on SportsCode (V10.1, Sportstec Ltd, Warriewood, NSW, Australia). Results: A significant difference was found between; delivery outcome during the build up to dismissals (χ2(5) = 1818.511, p < 0.001), pitch map analysis during the build up to dismissals (χ2(5) = 393.486, p < 0.001), pitch map analysis of wicket taking deliveries (χ2(11) = 94.620, p < 0.001) and wagon wheel analysis during the build up to dismissals (χ2(5) = 393.486, p < 0.001) when compared to the uniform distribution expected by chance. There was no significant difference between the amount of deliveries spent on or off strike (χ2(1) = 0.270, p = 0.603) compared to the uniform distribution expected by chance. Conclusion: The findings are a tool for coaches and batters to highlight possible strategies to avoid losing wickets, as well as strategies for fielding teams to encourage wicket taking. The results of this study suggest bowlers should look to bowl a variety of lines and lengths while consistently bowling a good length on off stump most often, as this area leads to wicket taking. Bowlers should aim to bowl dot balls, bowl an off stump line and use the short ball as a surprise delivery. To avoid losing their wicket, batsman should look to be aggressive and hit boundaries more often, reduce dot balls and hit straight down the ground to deliveries that promote LBW and bowled dismissals.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2017 17:52
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2017 17:52
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3134

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