The association between the adductor squeeze test, HAGOS questionnaire and the bent knee fall out in professional football players

Hughes-Jones, Zoe (2017) The association between the adductor squeeze test, HAGOS questionnaire and the bent knee fall out in professional football players. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Background: Previous findings suggest that the adductor squeeze test (AST), Hip and Groin Outcome Score questionnaire (HAGOS) and the Bent Knee Fall Out test (BKFO) are reliable tools in measuring the primary risk factors in hip/ groin pain.
Aim: The current study investigated the association between the AST, HAGOS and BKFO to determine their use within the clinical setting.
Method: 18 professional football players (age, 18.8 ± 1.18 years (range 17-21); mass, 75.5 ± 4.6 kg) within the U18 and U23 squads completed the HAGOS, BKFO and AST at two different positions (short-lever 0°, long-lever 45°) two days post game-day for a period of 4 months.
Results: Analysis showed a statistically significant correlation between AST and HAGOS (short-lever, rp = 0.348, p=0.006, long-lever, rp = 0.255, p=0.046) with the short-lever position explaining 12% of the variance (R2 = 0.121, p=0.006) and long-lever 6% of the variance (R2 = 0.065, p=0.046) to predict low HAGOS scores. Results also showed an association between the AST and HAGOS; if a deficit in AST was present, a reduction in HAGOS score was also apparent (and vice versa). Long-lever yielded a 56% higher torque production compared to the short-lever position. BKFO showed no correlation to the AST (short-lever, rp = 0.153, p=0.236, long-lever, rp = 0.193, p=0.133) or HAGOS (rp = 0.182, p=0.158). Paired sample t-tests found no significant difference in AST, HAGOS or BKFO between U18 and U23 squads.
Conclusion: AST and HAGOS provide statistical evidence for their use as measurement tools within the clinical setting in determining the risk factors for hip/groin pain.
Introduction

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: Bsc (Hons) Sports Therapy
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2017 14:31
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2017 14:31
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3097

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