The effect of a 6-week plyometric intervention on the lower body power and on trampoline jump height in trampoline gymnasts.

Hamilton, Francesca (2017) The effect of a 6-week plyometric intervention on the lower body power and on trampoline jump height in trampoline gymnasts. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Plyometrics has been widely researched, finding it an effective method for improving jump height and lower body power. It has not however been researched as a trampoline specific strength and conditioning intervention. Aim: This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a six-week plyometric program on the lower body power and on trampoline jump height in trampoline gymnasts. Method: In a mixed experimental study 19 competitive trampolinists (16 ± 3 years) were assigned to either a control or plyometric training group. The training group performed a progressive 6-week plyometric intervention, whilst the control group performed no plyometrics. All participants were tested pre- and post-intervention. Force plates were used to assess jump height and impulse of countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ). Trampoline jump height was assessed using time of flight (ToF) of 10 straight jumps. Data was analysed for differences between pre- and post-testing measures. Results: No significant differences were found, in neither lower body power (p>0.05) nor trampoline jump height (p>0.05), between pre- and post-testing in the control group. The training group showed no significant difference in trampoline jump height between pre- and post-testing (p>0.05). The training group showed significant increases in power, with both significantly increased CMJ and SJ height (p<0.05) and impulse (p<0.05), between pre- and post-testing. Conclusion: Results suggest that a 6-week plyometric training program was effective for significantly improving trampolinists lower body power on the floor. However, the plyometrics did not cause significant improvements on the trampoline, with no increases in trampoline jump height. Future research needs to further validate these findings, with greater sample sizes, as well as further investigation into the physiological demands of trampolining. Additionally, investigation of plyometrics on compliant surfaces would be beneficial due to the greater similarity to trampoline training and potential greater improvements in trampoline jump height.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Sport Science & Coaching
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports > GV711 Coaching
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2017 14:37
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2017 14:37
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3076

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