The effects of Dynamic Tape for medial longitudinal arch support on navicular height and plantar pressures during running activity.

Bage, Dawn (2017) The effects of Dynamic Tape for medial longitudinal arch support on navicular height and plantar pressures during running activity. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine if dynamic tape (DT) effectively supports the medial longitudinal arch during running.
Methods: Twelve participants (Mean (SD) age 23(±6.5) years) who were asymptomatic and exhibited a navicular drop >10mm were studied. Navicular height (NH) and plantar pressures (PP) were measured at four intervals during a single testing session: pre-tape, post-tape, post 20 minutes and post 30 minutes running. The participants non-dominant foot was untaped and acted as a control. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess NH on tape condition and time. T-tests were used to determine whether significant (p<0.05) differences in NH occurred with taping.
Results: A two-way repeated measures ANOVA identified that the untaped leg responded differently to the taped leg over time (F(3,33)=20.776, p<0.0005). DT resulted in statistically significant increases in NH pre to post-tape (p<0.0005); Pre-tape to 20 minutes running (p<0.0005) and Pre to 30 minutes running (p<0.0005). Whilst NH remained significantly higher than pre-tape there were statistically significant decreases in post-tape to 20 (p=0.004) and post-tape to 30 (p=0.001). There was no significant decrease between 20 and 30 minutes running (p=0.137). No significant changes were found for PP due to error in experimental design/statistical analysis.
Conclusions: Results indicate that DT successfully increases NH and maintains effective support of the MLA in up to 30 minutes running. Results for PP were not as expected but this was due to error in experimental design. Future research should focus on the effect of DT on PP during running but as there is a lack studies utilising DT, any RCT with larger sample sizes including both symptomatic and asymptomatic participants would be of value.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) SportsTherapy
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2017 14:37
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2017 14:37
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3074

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