The effect of backwards walking on hamstring flexibility and dynamic balance.

Hadfield, Alice (2017) The effect of backwards walking on hamstring flexibility and dynamic balance. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of backwards walking on hamstring flexibility and dynamic balance. Thirty male and female students from the University of Chichester participated, with a mean age of 20.87 ± 0.94 years, a mean height of 172.60 ± 8.90 centimetres and a mean weight of 70.74 ± 16.89 kilograms. Fifteen participants were allocated to either the backwards walking experimental group or the control group. The backwards walking was carried out on a treadmill, three times a week for four-weeks. Each session consisted of a five-minute forward walking warm-up and 10 minutes of backwards walking. Hamstring flexibility and dynamic balance were assessed before and after the backwards walking intervention. Hamstring flexibility was measured by the modified active knee extension test and dynamic balance was measured by the Y balance test. Statistical analysis was carried out using multiple two-way mixed ANOVA and Paired t-test, with a 0.05 significance level. Regarding hamstring flexibility, the ANOVA showed a significant difference over time (p = 0.004), a non-significant interaction between time and group (p = 0.143) and a non-significant difference between groups (p = 0.346). A Paired t-test showed hamstring flexibility to significantly improve over time in the experimental group (p = 0.013). However, it did not significantly improve in the control group (p = 0.206). For dynamic balance, there was a significant difference over time for the anterior (p = 0.05), posterolateral (p = 0.049) and posteromedial (p = 0.006) directions. There was a non-significant interaction between time and group for the anterior (p = 0.715), posterolateral (p = 0.420) and posteromedial directions (p = 0.742). Additionally, there was also a non-significant difference between groups for the anterior (p = 0.393), posterolateral (p = 0.967) and posteromedial (p = 0.783) directions. All participants improved in their backwards walking speed over the four-week intervention. In conclusion, this research found backwards walking did not significantly improve hamstring flexibility or dynamic balance, however there are indications that backwards walking has clinical relevance.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Sport Therapy
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2017 14:41
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2017 14:48
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/3025

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