Individualised training at different intensities, in untrained participants, results in similar physiological and performance benefits

Coakley, Sarah L. and Passfield, Louis (2018) Individualised training at different intensities, in untrained participants, results in similar physiological and performance benefits. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 (8). pp. 881-888. ISSN 0264-0414

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Text (This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sport Sciences on 27 July 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02640414.2017.1346269)
Coakley, SL & Passfield, L (2017) Individualised training at different intensities, in untrained participants, results in similar physiological and performance benefits. Journal of Sports Sciences. 27. 1-8.pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

This study compared effects of training at moderate, high, or a combination of the two intensities (mixed) on performance and physiological adaptations, when training durations were individualised. Untrained participants (n=34) were assigned to a moderate, high, or mixed group. Maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), power output at V̇O2max (MAP), time-to-exhaustion and gross efficiency were recorded before and after four weeks of cycling training (four times per week). The moderate group cycled at 60% MAP in blocks of 5 min with 1 min recovery, and training duration was individualised to 100% of pre-training time-to-exhaustion. The high group cycled at 100% MAP for 2 min with 3 min recovery, and training duration was set as the maximum number of repetitions completed in the first training session. The mixed group completed two moderate- and two high-intensity sessions each week, on alternate days. V̇O2max, MAP, and time-to-exhaustion increased after training (P<0.05), but were not different between groups (P>0.05). The mixed group improved their gross efficiency at 50% MAP more than the other two groups (P = 0.044) after training. When training is individualised for untrained participants, similar improvements in performance and physiological measures are found, despite marked differences in exercise intensity and total training duration.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sarah Coakley
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2017 13:51
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2019 01:10
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/2954

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