Autism Spectrum Condition: A natural human variation or a disability in need of a cure?

Knight, Jamie-Lee (2017) Autism Spectrum Condition: A natural human variation or a disability in need of a cure? Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The aim of the independent project is to discover if parents and practitioners believe that autism is a natural human variation, as endorsed by the neurodiversity movement, or a disability in need of a cure. The seven participants were recruited using opportunity sampling. The study has an interpretivist methodology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to obtain qualitative data. The data was then analysed using thematic analysis. The research question is explored using three key aims. The first aim was to investigate whether participants believe autism to be a disability. Six of the seven participants believe that autism is a disability. The second aim was to explore the challenges associated with autism. The main challenges recognised for the child are a difficulty in regulating sensory information and the recognition that they are different to others. The core challenges identified for the family are being isolated from society and managing the challenging behaviours of a child with autism. The third aim was to explore if participants would endorse a cure for autism if one were created. Two of the participants are certain they would endorse a cure for autism and three of the participants expressed that they would consider a cure. The final two participants would not endorse a cure for autism if one were created. The one certain result is that the participants are not aware of the neurodiversity movement. The conclusion of the study is that autism is generally perceived as a disability for which a majority would consider curing.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Departments > Childhood and Youth
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 10 Aug 2017 11:47
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2017 11:47
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/2926

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