Self-Affirmation and Negative Automatic Thoughts. Exploring their role in predicting intentions, regret and perceived behavioural control of reducing snack consumption.

Capaldi, Lucie (2017) Self-Affirmation and Negative Automatic Thoughts. Exploring their role in predicting intentions, regret and perceived behavioural control of reducing snack consumption. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Background: Obesity is a significant problem within society and is steadily increasing. A major contributor to obesity is snacking. Internal factors associated with snacking such as stress and negative affect can influence behaviours. Motivators of behaviour change such as intention, anticipated regret (AR) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) have been shown to predict health behaviours Similarly, self-affirmation manipulations have also been indicated in promoting positive health changes. Objective: Reducing snacking consumption may be a strategy for weight management. The aim of the current study is to explore whether a self-affirmation manipulation can predict the intentions AR and PBC towards reducing snack consumption. The study explored whether Negative Automatic Thoughts (NAT) could influence intention, AR and PBC towards snacking consumption and whether it moderated any effects of the self-affirmation manipulation. Method: Over a 3-week period, 12 males and 91 females completed 3 online questionnaires 1-week apart. Participants provided details about their intentions, AR and PBC toward reducing snack consumption, and a questionnaire relating to the frequency of NAT. A self-affirmation intervention was completed with participants randomly selected to 1 of 2 conditions – self affirmed (SA) or control (CC). Results: The self-affirmation manipulation significantly predicted PBC, however, it did not extend to intention or AR. NAT significantly predicted intention and AR, though did not extend to PBC. Moderating effects of NAT and the self-affirmation manipulation were found for AR, however these did not extend to Intention. Conclusions: The study contributes, in part to the research allaying to self-affirmation as a tool to aid beneficial health behaviours, and highlights the often overlooked role of NAT as a potential predictor of increased snacking.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons) Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Wendy Ellison
Date Deposited: 10 Aug 2017 12:28
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2017 12:28
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/2896

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