The Influence of an in-season injury prevention training program on landing kinematics and performance indicators on female soccer players.

Morledge, Robert (2016) The Influence of an in-season injury prevention training program on landing kinematics and performance indicators on female soccer players. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Reports suggest that over 70% of ACL injuries occur as a result of non-contact mechanisms during high velocity sports such as landing from a jump, rapid deceleration, cutting and pivoting whilst the foot is planted (Mihata, L. C., Beutler, A.
I., & Boden, 2006). Due to the devastating physical, mental and emotional effects of the injury, numerous studies and prevention programs have been introduced and with significant results. However, programs may be of more interest to practitioners if they were more centred around performance than injury prevention. Studies have failed
to combine both performance variables, landing kinematics and rate of ACL injury in their reports. The study will aim to examine the effects of the IPP adapted from Mandelbaum et al. (2005) on landing kinematics and performance indicators. 20 Female Soccer players (Mean + SD: Mass 63.4±1.2 kg, Height 158.7+ 8.9 cm)volunteered to participate in the study – 10 of whom were part of the injury prevention program (IPP) and 10 in the control group. The IPP lasted for 8 weeks during the season. Knee flexion, Knee valgus and Hip flexion were measured pre and post IPP – in addition to Agility, vertical jump height and broad jump. A paired samples t-test discovered a significant change shown in knee valgus values (p = 0.001) from 171⁰ to 180.9⁰ and moderate effects found in hip flexion angles from 110⁰ to 105⁰ (p= 0.316). There was no significant difference found in knee flexion (p = 0.695). Post IPP T-Test times were significantly declined (p = 0.001). A small effect was found in the CMJ, p = (0.377). The control group displayed no change from pre to post conditions.The findings suggest that an injury prevention program can be implemented as a warm up to reduce dangerous knee moments and the incidence of ACL injury. However, the program seems to lack the required stimuli to improve athletic performance.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BSc (Hons.) Sports Coaching Science
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Departments > Sport and Exercise Sciences
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2016 14:36
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2016 14:36
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/1986

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