The influence of adult attachment style on parent and peer relationships, perceived social support and coping strategies in the transition to university.

Stedman, Sonny (2016) The influence of adult attachment style on parent and peer relationships, perceived social support and coping strategies in the transition to university. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Attachment theory has grown to become a paradigm crucial for the study of parent-child relationships, critical in our understanding of early development and close relationships in general (Tarabulsy & Symons, 2016). Research on the transition to university has found that those who are securely attached generally transition more successfully than those who are insecurely attached. The present study had 10 participants who completed both a questionnaire to assess their adult attachment status and a semi-structured interview that aimed to explore how attachment type influences relationships with parents and peers, perceived social support and coping strategies. It was hypothesised based on previous findings that securely attached individuals would have better relationships with parents and peers, higher perceived social support and more effective coping strategies, compared to insecure individuals. A discourse analysis was performed and discourses emerged in each of these areas. The findings supported the hypotheses to the most extent. However, effective coping strategies were used by insecure individuals more than originally expected. Explanations for this finding are presented and implications and ideas for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Steve Bowman
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2016 11:21
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2016 11:21
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/1892

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