Effects of socioeconomic background in relation to gender identity on the development and reinforcement of gender stereotypes in adolescents

Williams, Georgia A. G. (2016) Effects of socioeconomic background in relation to gender identity on the development and reinforcement of gender stereotypes in adolescents. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

Gender stereotypes are undergoing dynamic change in the 21st Century, with development towards egalitarian values. Gender identity has become a social rights focus due to a rising number of gender non-conformists. Whilst previous research has suggested a relationship between gender stereotype deviance and higher socioeconomic status, little research has explored gender identity deviance and socioeconomic status. This study’s hypotheses were that gender stereotype adherence would decrease with increased socioeconomic status, and that gender identity deviance would positively correlate with higher socioeconomic status due to decreased social stigma concerning gender non-conformity. 18 participants, aged 15-16, from a Dorset school were measured on socioeconomic status, gender stereotype adherence and gender identity adherence through questionnaires and interviews. Correlational analysis confirmed a significant, one-tailed relationship between high socioeconomic status and low gender stereotype adherence, supporting the first hypothesis. Correspondence analysis displayed that gender non-conformity was more prevalent amongst higher socioeconomic status participants; a trend which supported the second hypothesis. These findings encourage further research into confirming definitive relationships between the factors and exploring causational relationships between gender stereotypes, gender identity and socioeconomic status, to determine how prejudice and environmental resources may impact adolescent self-expression and attitudes towards non-conforming gender minorities.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Departments > Psychology and Counselling
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Steve Bowman
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2016 11:16
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2016 11:16
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/1890

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