The influence of a hypoxic environment on motor coordination of skiers

Baggs, A., (2015) The influence of a hypoxic environment on motor coordination of skiers. Undergraduate thesis, University of Chichester.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hypoxic environment on motor coordination in skiers, in order to represent the effects that skiing at high altitude may have on the participant. Participants (total N=13), eight male and five female students, aged 21.8 ± 1.4 years, completed two sets of performance trials on a ski simulator; one under normal atmospheric conditions (20.9% oxygen), and one in a controlled environment chamber at a simulated altitude of 3500m (13.5% effective oxygen). Participants’ performances were recorded with a video camera and analysed to calculate scores for amplitude, consistency and frequency. Participant’s oxygen saturation, heart rate and NASA Task Load Index scores were also recorded.Results suggest that high altitude exposure significantly impaired outside foot amplitude and frequency of performance. However, consistency of performance was maintained and significantly improved in the case of lateral control and outside foot consistency.The significant deterioration outside foot amplitude could possibly be attributed to muscular fatigue, and the decrease in frequency of performance attributed to participants implementing a trade-off strategy between frequency and quality of movements. The maintained or increased consistency of performance could be attributed to the body being capable of maintaining sufficient oxygen to the brain.
Key terms: Motor coordination, hypoxia, high altitude exposure, skiing, ski simulator

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Additional Information: BA (Hons) Adventure Education
Uncontrolled Keywords: Motor coordination, hypoxia, skiing
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Departments > Adventure Education
Undergraduate Dissertations
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2015 11:20
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2015 11:20
URI: http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/id/eprint/1527

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